HEAR · Publications

HEAR – Focus on Traumatic Brain Injury & Concussion

Welcome to the 3rd issue of HEAR for 2018. The purpose of the Health Evidence Awareness Report is to provide specialised information to health professionals, patients and the public about specific health topics. Each issue is a result of the collaboration of librarians from health organisations across Ireland. This issue looks at some aspects of traumatic brain injury and concussion. 

HEAR TBI & Concussion

Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI)

A TBI is caused by a bump, blow, or jolt to the head that disrupts the normal function of the brain. Not all blows or jolts to the head result in a TBI. The severity of a TBI may range from “mild” (i.e., a brief change in mental status or consciousness) to “severe” (i.e., an extended period of unconsciousness or memory loss after the injury). Most TBIs that occur each year are mild, commonly called concussions. 

Concussion

Concussion is defined by the HSE as “the sudden but short-lived loss of mental function that occurs after a blow or other injury to the head. The medical term for concussion is minor traumatic brain injury”. Symptoms include memory loss, confusion, brief loss of consciousness, vision disturbance HSE A-Z Health Topics Concussion

View volume 4, issue 3 on LENUS

 

HEAR · Publications

HEAR – focus on bereavement

HEAR BereavementThe purpose of HEAR is to provide specialised information to health professionals, patients and the public about key health topics. Each issue is the result of the collaborative effort of librarians from health organisations across Ireland.

This month, the focus is on Bereavement. As the only certainly we have in life is our own mortality, bereavement is an issue that affects every single one of us at some point in our lives.

Inside this issue:

  •  80 people die in Ireland every day.
  •  Approximately, 30,000 people die every year
  •  At any one time, one in 10 people are likely to be affected (McGuinness, 2007).
  •  53% or Irish people have experienced the death of someone close to them in the last two years.
  •  Research by the ESRI (Growing up in Ireland) demonstrates that 2.2% of nine year olds have lost a parent, 1.1% a sibling, 7% an aunt or uncle and 28% a grandparent.

View this issue of HEAR on Lenus

Events · News

HSLG AGM 2018 and Network evening with A&SL at RCSI Library

The HSLG 2018 AGM will take place on Wednesday 27 June 2018 in the Bouchier-Hayes Auditorium, RCSI, 26 York Street, Dublin 2 at 16.30.

HSLG members should register to attend here

The AGM is an important event for members and committee members, so please do attend. Additional information about the AGM will be sent out to the HSLG mailing list.

And do remember that registration for the HSLG and A&SL Networking event, beginning on Wed 27th June at 17.30 in RCSI, is separate and you must register here to attend that event.

We will join the library staff on a tour of the library in RCSI’s new education building at 26 York Street. Please note that there are two different time slots, so please register your preference. Tours will start promptly. Latecomers will be brought up to the lecture room.

We will then hear from Kate Kelly, Director of Library Services, RCSI Library, who will provide us with some insights into competencies and professional standards in librarianship.

Stay on for the wine reception!

Spaces are limited so don’t delay!  

 

HEAR · Publications

HEAR – focus on homelessness

HEAR (Health Evidence Awareness Report). volume 4, issue 1. Focus on homelessness. March 2018.  HEAR homelessness

The purpose of HEAR is to provide specially selected information to patients, the public and to health professionals about key health topics. Each issue is the result of the collaborative effort of librarians from health organisations across Ireland.

Homelessness is an increasingly common phenomena in Irish society at present. Individuals who are homeless face a myriad of challenges in accessing health care services. Additionally, they tend to make more frequent use of emergency departments, to have mental or physical health problems and to have different priorities in terms of their health.

This issue of HEAR is available through the LENUS repository