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Bursary for ICML/EAHIL conference in Dublin Castle, June 2017

hslg-application-for-funding-to-attend-icml-eahil-2017

We are delighted to offer a number of bursaries for HSLG members to attend continuing education courses or the full ICML/EAHIL conference, taking place 12-16 June in Dublin Castle.

You can view the draft programme at http://eahil2017.net/registration/ (if applying for a bursary don’t register on the site).

To apply, fill in the form above and return to info@hslg.ie  or Contacthslg@gmail.com by 24th February 2017.

We expect a lot of interest and there are limited number of bursaries so apply soon.

 

The HSLG Committee

email: contacthslg@gmail.com

Twitter: @healthlibraries

 

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Opportunity to share your value at the international ICML/EAHIL conference in Dublin 2017

The abstract submission deadline for the ICML + EAHIL 2017 workshop in Dublin has been extended to 19th October 2016.
 
We trust this will give you enough time to submit your abstracts for oral presentations, posters, interactive sessions or continuing education courses about the following topics:
Diversity in Practice: Integrating, Inspiring & Innovative
  • Leadership & Values
  • Integration
  • Technology
  • Education & Learning
  • Consumer Health
  • Research & Evidence-based Librarianship
 
For further information please visit our website: http://eahil2017.net/  
Twitter:@ICML2017
To catch up on the tips on submitting an abstract shared during the #AskAMentor Chat this week, please see this link
Conference

View the presentations from HSLG2016

After a fantastic conference in May, we thought we’d give you an extra chance for reflection by adding the presentations to the website. Check out your favourite presentations below.

Day 1, 12 May 2016

Keynote speech: Something Old, Something New: Health Librarian Capabilities for the Knowledge Economy and the Digital Age by Ann Wales

Building value into a core skill.” by Anne Madden, St. Vincent’s University Hospital,

Advancing our skillset: building the Rudai 23 e-learning course for information professionals” by Caroline Rowan, St Michael’s Hospital and Stephanie Ronan, Marine Institute

Making Our Skills Visible Through Research by Aoife Lawton, Health Service Executive

Advancing skills: from ‘lovely librarians’ to knowledge ninjas by Mary Dunne & Mairea Nelson, Health Research Board,

Learning from e-learning in other organisations by Joanne Callinan, Milford Care Centre,

Putting it into Practice: applying the skill set by Kate Kelly, Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland

Why and What to Measure? Understanding & Using Altmetrics to evaluate impact. by Jane Burns, Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland & School of Information & Communication Studies, University College Dublin

Posters

The Skillset of a Health Science Library Assistant by Jesse Walters, Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland

Sharing our expertise: Lets HEAR about it! by Caroline Rowan, St. Michael’s Hospital, Dun Laoghaire

Development of Rotunda: Birth of a Nation 1916 Centenary Exhibition at the Rotunda by Anne M. O’Byrne, Rotunda Hospital

Day 2, 13 May 2016

Bibliometrics: Maximising & Assessing Research Impact by Fintan Bracken, University of Limerick

Conference

HSLG 2016: meet the presenters #10

Kate Kelly: Putting it into Practice: applying the skill set

Kate is Director of Library Services at the Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland (RCSI).RCSI is currently building a new academic education centre incorporating a new library and has been recruiting for new positions over the last year. Kate has spent most of her library career in health sciences working in the USA and Ireland. She has an MSc in Health Services Research and is a fellow of the Library Association of Ireland (FLAI) and distinguished member of the US Academy of Health Information Professionals (AHIP).

Abstract

In support of its strategy “Growth and Excellence” RCSI is building a new medical education centre incorporating a new health sciences library. Planning for this building challenged library staff at all levels to consider and reconsider what it is we do, how we do it, and why we do it. What if anything differentiates a health sciences library and health sciences librarians from other libraries? Using RCSI Library as a case study this presentation will share some of the learnings from our benchmarking exercises as prelude to a restructuring and the thinking behind resulting new positions.

 

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HSLG 2016: meet the presenters #9

Fintan Bracken: Bibliometrics: Maximising & Assessing Research Impact

Fintan is the Research Services and Bibliometrics Librarian in the University of Limerick. In this role, Fintan is responsible for providing services to researchers in many aspects of the research process including bibliometrics, open access, publication strategy and maximising research impact. Prior to joining UL in October 2013, Fintan worked with IReL, the Irish Research eLibrary. He has also previously worked in the Marine Institute’s research library. Fintan completed a PhD in zoology in 2004 and has published research on various topics including bird biodiversity and usability studies. LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/in/fintanbracken.

Abstract

In the last decade, the use of bibliometrics has become more mainstream in universities and research institutions throughout the world. Bibliometrics refers to the quantitative measures used to assess research output, in other words, publication and citation analysis. This workshop will provide:

  • An overview of bibliometrics and how they can be used;
  • An explanation of the main metrics used;
  • Details on how to find citations to articles and how to calculate the h-index of a researcher using the three main citation tools, Web of Science, Scopus and Google Scholar;
  • Information on other methods and tools to assess the research impact of individuals and groups;
  • An explanation of the main journal metrics and instructions on how to find each.

This workshop will also highlight five key methods for optimising the impact of research including publishing in high impact journals (e.g. using ScimagoJR.com), ensuring a researcher’s outputs are easily identifiable (e.g. using ORCID and Google Scholar Profiles), increasing the visibility of publications (e.g. using Open Access), and promoting research (e.g. using social media).

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HSLG 2016: meet the presenters #8

Caroline Rowan & Stephanie Ronan: Advancing our skillset: building the Rudai23 e-learning course for information professionalsrudai23

Caroline is the health librarian in St. Michael’s Hospital. She has several  undergraduate and postgraduate qualifications including a Master of Arts and a Master of Library & Information Studies.  An enthusiastic advocate for libraries, she is a Communications Officer for the Health Sciences Library Group, a co-editor of HINT: Health Information News & Thinking and a collaborator on HEAR: Health Evidence Awareness Report and on the Rudai 23 professional development course. Twitter – @librarianintown, LinkedIn – ie.linkedin.com/in/rowancaroline

Stephanie is an information professional, providing the library services to the Marine Institute in Galway. As a solo librarian, she manages all aspects of the library including the institutional repository and is quickly becoming a marine information expert. She is secretary for the WRSLAI, collaborator on Rudai23 and a founding member of the Repository Network Ireland. Twitter @StephanieRonan, LinkedIn https://ie.linkedin.com/in/sronan

Abstract

Rudaí 23 is a free online course based on the original 23 Things format by Helene Blowers. It was developed by a collaboration comprising several members of the Western Regional Section of the Library Association of Ireland and additional contributors from the library and education sectors. The primary aims comprised the provision of instruction in relation to web tools, advocacy and on legal, technical and professional topics. The course is the first online course to be certified by the Library Association of Ireland.

This presentation examines the skills needed to establish, develop, moderate and manage an online course with a team of eleven voluntary instructors. To initiate the course, team members became competent in design tools, policy writing, recruitment and social media marketing. The course was managed and run on-line thus the team worked without verbal and visual cues, honing communication and team-working skills. Rudaí 23 consisted of 23 modules; in producing these modules the team advanced their researching, writing, editing and design skills, as well as adhering to copyright laws. Finally the presentation examines the skills advanced through acquiring project feedback and the organisation of a certificate presentation ceremony.

Conference

HSLG 2016: meet the presenters #7

Ann Wales: Something Old, Something New: Health Librarian Capabilities for the Knowledge Economy and the Digital Age

IMG_Ann_1702

Since 2005, Ann has held the national role of Programme Director for Knowledge Management in NHS Education for Scotland, leading national strategic development of knowledge management across health and social care. This has included delivery of the national online Knowledge Network as a national gateway to evidence, information and learning resources for health and social care. Ann also worked with partners to design and operationalise a national service  for translating knowledge into action in health and social care, with a strong focus on developing knowledge broker roles to facilitate that process  The constant driving force behind Ann’s work is her commitment to translating knowledge into decisions and actions to improve health and care.

Abstract

Drawing upon international research and upon the experience of the Knowledge into Action Strategy for Health and Social Services in Scotland, this presentation will explore the knowledge, skills, behaviours and mindsets required to realise the potential of the health librarian role in the 21st Century. It will highlight the need for librarians to respond to transformation of health and social care delivery; the “digital first” approach to public services, the growth of the knowledge economy, and the financial challenges underlying all these drivers for change.  An overarching theme is the need to develop beyond the traditional librarian role in organising information to become knowledge brokers that facilitate the translation of knowledge into practice. Participants will be invited to debate the real-life challenges of evolving professional identity and skills in this changing context.