Conference

HSLG 2016: meet the presenters #10

Kate Kelly: Putting it into Practice: applying the skill set

Kate is Director of Library Services at the Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland (RCSI).RCSI is currently building a new academic education centre incorporating a new library and has been recruiting for new positions over the last year. Kate has spent most of her library career in health sciences working in the USA and Ireland. She has an MSc in Health Services Research and is a fellow of the Library Association of Ireland (FLAI) and distinguished member of the US Academy of Health Information Professionals (AHIP).

Abstract

In support of its strategy “Growth and Excellence” RCSI is building a new medical education centre incorporating a new health sciences library. Planning for this building challenged library staff at all levels to consider and reconsider what it is we do, how we do it, and why we do it. What if anything differentiates a health sciences library and health sciences librarians from other libraries? Using RCSI Library as a case study this presentation will share some of the learnings from our benchmarking exercises as prelude to a restructuring and the thinking behind resulting new positions.

 

Conference

HSLG 2016: meet the presenters #7

Ann Wales: Something Old, Something New: Health Librarian Capabilities for the Knowledge Economy and the Digital Age

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Since 2005, Ann has held the national role of Programme Director for Knowledge Management in NHS Education for Scotland, leading national strategic development of knowledge management across health and social care. This has included delivery of the national online Knowledge Network as a national gateway to evidence, information and learning resources for health and social care. Ann also worked with partners to design and operationalise a national service  for translating knowledge into action in health and social care, with a strong focus on developing knowledge broker roles to facilitate that process  The constant driving force behind Ann’s work is her commitment to translating knowledge into decisions and actions to improve health and care.

Abstract

Drawing upon international research and upon the experience of the Knowledge into Action Strategy for Health and Social Services in Scotland, this presentation will explore the knowledge, skills, behaviours and mindsets required to realise the potential of the health librarian role in the 21st Century. It will highlight the need for librarians to respond to transformation of health and social care delivery; the “digital first” approach to public services, the growth of the knowledge economy, and the financial challenges underlying all these drivers for change.  An overarching theme is the need to develop beyond the traditional librarian role in organising information to become knowledge brokers that facilitate the translation of knowledge into practice. Participants will be invited to debate the real-life challenges of evolving professional identity and skills in this changing context.

Conference · Uncategorized

HSLG 2016: meet the presenters #6

Jesse Waters: The Skill Set of a Health Science Library Assistant

Jesse is  a 2015 graduate of the MLIS at University College Dublin, and also holds an MA in History from Mary Immaculate College. He has a great deal of experience in academic libraries, having volunteered at the library at Limerick School of Art and Design and the Glucksman Library (University of Limerick). He recently worked at the James Joyce  Library (University College Dublin) and is currently a part time library-assistant at the Mercer Library (Royal College of Surgeons).

Abstract

The Skill Set of a Health Science Library Assistant` highlights the core skills required from a library assistant, and those which are developed over time while working at the service desk of a health science library. From his own experience, he has identified three categories of skills that a library assistant should possess. First are the skills necessary before one enters the role, such as communication and research skills. Second are the skills which are realised when one becomes comfortable in their individual library, including knowledge of customer needs and library resources. Third are those which develop with experience in ones library, including specific subject knowledge such as health and medicine.