Evidence-Informed-Healthcare

Evidence informed healthcare charter

The HSE’s National Health Library and Knowledge Service is leading a national communications campaign aimed at highlighting the increasingly prominent role of librarians and library services in enabling evidence informed healthcare.  The campaign is being run in partnership with the Department of Health, National Patient Safety Office, Health Science Libraries Group, with input from Patient Focus and health librarians in Ireland.

National Health Library and Knowledge Service logo       EIH_logocropped-hslglogo-banner11.jpg

The key message for the campaign is that “Libraries and library staff enable evidence informed healthcare.” 

On 31st July, 2017 an Evidence Informed Healthcare Charter was launched.  The charter sets out the principles of evidence informed healthcare and the role of patients, providers, policy makers and librarians in enabling evidence in practice.

Who is the charter for?

The charter is for people in receipt of healthcare (patients and clients), people who provide care (healthcare professionals), people who manage health policy (civil and public sector) and people who enable evidence informed healthcare (health librarians).

Why should I sign it?

You are encouraged to sign the charter for the following reasons:
1) to help promote awareness of the importance of evidence informed healthcare in Ireland among patients, healthcare practitioners and health policy makers.
2) to raise the profile of health librarians in enabling evidence informed healthcare.

How can I sign it?

Please sign the charter using this online form.  Alternatively, please download the Word version of the charter here, sign it and return to: National Health Service Librarian, HSE, Rm. 2.58, Dr. Steevens’ Hospital, Dublin 8.

What happens next?

If you use Twitter, please tweet a link to your signed charter or simply Tweet “I signed the #evidenceinformedhealthcare charter @hselibrary”.  If you are not using Twitter, we will capture signatures and make them available on these webpages.

Who has signed the Charter?

Please search Twitter using #EvidenceInformedHealthcare to see who has already signed the Charter.  A full list of names will be made available at the end of 2017.  Please see signatures from the Department of Health and the National Health Service Librarian.

I have more questions, who can I contact?

If you need further information please contact hselibrary

Health librarians and libraries acquire, organise and make accessible best available evidence to answer the 100,000 healthcare questions that arise annually in the HSE as part of the delivery of modern standards of patient care. Whether at ward or departmental level, or in supporting National Clinical Programmes such as the National Clinical Effectiveness Committee, National Patient Safety Office or the National Cancer Control Programme, the expertise of librarians in sourcing best evidence is making a key contribution to the wider quality and safety agenda.

The Twitter hashtag for the campaign is #EvidenceInformedHealthcare.

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Conference · Uncategorized

HSLG 2016: meet the presenters #2

Aoife Lawton: Making Our Skills Visible Through Research

aoife lawtonAoife, MLIS, ALAI works as a systems librarian for the Health Service Executive. Based in Dr. Steevens’ Hospital, she is responsible for managing Lenus the Irish Health Repository, electronic resource management and is involved in system reform projects. Aoife is the author of “The Invisible Librarian” a book published in 2015 to raise the profile, visibility and impact of the work that librarians do. She is the IPC chair for ICML/EAHIL/HSLG 2017 conference. Her interests include: evidence based librarianship, emerging technologies, open access and continuing professional development. Twitter: aalawton

Abstract

Research, Analysis and Interpretation is one of the seven competency areas outlined by the Medical Library Association as conducive to professional success. The Standards for Irish Healthcare Library & Information Services (2004) include several references to the importance of research skills for librarians under several criteria: User Education, Systematic Review skills, Needs Assessment and Library & Information Service Staff Training. Paying attention to the external environment is equally important for health science librarians and information professionals. One of the three strategic recommendations that emerged from the SHeLLI report included “Staff and service development”. From this, a specific recommendation was “Health librarians should identify clinical research opportunities in all sectors, and offer their information and knowledge skills to the research team”.

One of the main benefits of carrying out research is that it increases the visibility of the skills of a librarian to a broad audience. This is achieved by working with health care professionals, collaborating on research projects and publishing. This presentation will focus on the experience of one health science librarian’s writing and publishing journey with the intention of inspiring others to get writing and get publishing.